Am I a slut? | Marianopolis World Review
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Am I a slut?

08/02/2017

Written by Véronique Leblanc

I had no idea how to start this article, so I decide to google the term “slut” and see what would come up, on the off chance that an idea might pop into my head and I’d have a moment of insight on how to put the anger I have for the term into words.

One of the first results, unsurprisingly, was Urban Dictionary.

 

“Slut

A woman with the morals of a man”

 

Before anyone misunderstands my intentions and comes under the impression that I think Urban Dictionary is a serious resource for research; I don’t.

I do, however, think that this definition is a symptom of a much larger issue, and of a global frame of mind that not only restricts natural and healthy female sexuality but has the potential of making men feel inadequate or emasculated if they do not adhere to the stereotype of male sexuality.

The term “slut” effectively segregates men and women: it dictates the way women and men are supposed to flirt, date and make love. It tells women to sit back and not vocalize what they desire and tells men that they have to consistently crave intercourse – and provides the males that fit into that category the behavioral reinforcement that ensures a cycle of continuation.

I, for one, have never heard a man apologize or feel bad for their number of previous sexual partners. An aberration here and there is undeniably possible, but the overall consensus is that men who participate in sexual activities with a variety of different women are more likely to be labelled as “experienced” than as “sluts”, more so than a women will ever be.

The term “slut” also manages to segregate women. It marks a line between good and bad, one that has suffered a cycle of reinforcement through religious beliefs and outdated practices. Virginity has proven to be a concept important to so many individuals. The “slut” epidemic isn’t something practiced solely by men, it’s a word used by everybody – including women pitting themselves against other women in order to feel superior.

What I’ve seen from my experience and that of my friends, is that a higher “number” translates to feelings of inadequacy. A higher “number” feels like a deal breaker. Noticeably, it isn’t the intention of many of the people who frequently use the term “slut” to effectively shame and scare women out of expressing their sexuality in healthy ways, but the result remains the same.

If we, as a society, continue to regularly use terms like “slut” and “whore” – terms that are blatantly sexiest and that even further victim shaming – there is no possibility for true female liberation.

Sex is normal. In fact, sex is kind of great – when it is safe and consensual.

So why do we continue to make women feel bad for wanting it, having it, thinking about it or even being open to talking about it?

 

Written by MWR Executive Editor, Véronique Leblanc


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